“The art of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan, is perhaps the last territory which is unclearly marked on the global artistic map.”

Victor Misiano

Curator, Critic and Former Director,

Centre of Contemporary Art, Moscow

Introducing ENE Central Asian Art (ENECAA)

ENECAA’s mission is to make Central Asian art accessible. We are an online platform for collecting art and offer specialist advisory services as well as research. Our unique galleries comprise the works of leading artists from across Central Asia, and we engage directly with all the artists whose works we represent.

ENE means mother in Turkemen.  Our founders agreed that their mothers were the first people that came to mind when they were envisaging and individual they knew well and whose characteristics inspired them.  A person who embodied the company’s brand values – trust, integrity and wisdom.

 

ENECAA is an online gallery, art advisory and research company. Our gallery showcases the works of Central Asia’s most important artists as well as emerging new talents, and we welcome enquiries from buyers.

Where is Central Asia?

Central Asia is a region of Asia from the Caspian Sea in the west to central China in the east, and from southern Russia in the north to northern India in the south. It includes the five former Soviet republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, as well as Afghanistan and parts of Iran, China, Mongolia, Pakistan, India, and southwestern Siberia.

The Artists ENECAA Represents Today

The established modern and contemporary Central Asian artists ENECAA represents, from the former Soviet republics of Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan were initially trained in architecture, monumental Socialist Realist painting and sculpture at Soviet art schools. Their works are recognised, exhibited and have been acquired by museums as well as private collectors, and selected to appear in international biennales. Their art can be divided into three areas of inspiration: the Soviet past, the patriarchal past and Western influence.